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Social Security Disability benefits for a work-related injury

Millions of Americans are employed at jobs where their safety and even their very lives may be at risk on a daily basis. Jobs in the construction industry, public safety and industrial jobs are usually high on the list of the types of employment that may lead to a work-related injury. For many of the people who suffer injuries on the job, it may mean a few days of lost wages that are covered by worker's compensation, and then they are back on the job. However, there are some people who suffer injuries so severe that they are unable to work for an extended period of time.

Worker's compensation may cover some lost wages and medical expenses, but what happens if an injury results in a disability? A disability from a work-related injury that leaves a Los Angeles resident with a complete inability to work may result in that person's being eligible for Social Security Disability benefits.

No matter the cause of a person's disability, there are federal requirements that must be met in order to be approved to receive SSD benefits. The disability must be a long-term condition, that is, it must keep the applicant from working and earning an income for at least 12 months. But the severity of the disability isn't the only requirement. The person who is applying for SSD benefits must also have the appropriate amount of earned work credits to qualify.

It is clear that work-related injuries can qualify a Los Angeles resident for SSD benefits. What is less clear is a Los Angeles resident's ability to submit a successful application for benefits. Taking the time to learn the various requirements upfront could make a difference.

Source: ssa.gov, "Workplace Injuries and the Take-Up of Social Security Disability Benefits," Accessed May 21, 2016

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