Jump to Navigation

February 2012 Archives

Paperless disability payments may leave California parents broke

This week, a U.S. Treasury Department initiative expected to save more than $1 billion over the next 10 years alone begins to affect new recipients of Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits. This means that anyone approved for disability benefits on or after this Thursday (March 1) will receive their monthly payments via direct deposit into a bank account or through a Treasury-issued debit card.

California judge rules for plaintiffs in disability review case

If you are already receiving Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits, you may be subjected to periodic reviews of your ability to work. If the Social Security Administration (SSA) determines that you are exceeding its income level limits after conducting a work review, the agency may take action to terminate, suspend or reduce your monthly disability benefits.

New criteria for Alzheimer's may reduce diagnoses

A couple of weeks ago, we wrote about a new proposed definition of autism, which is expected to significantly reduce the number of children who are diagnosed with the disorder. Now, it appears that new criteria for a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease may have a similar effect, and may result in a significant drop in the number of people who are eligible for Social Security Disability benefits based on an Alzheimer's diagnosis.

What not to do if your SSD application is denied (two)

Last week, we shared a few things you should not do after your Social Security Disability claim has been denied. Although the prospect of an SSD appeal can be very daunting, it is important to stay focused and dedicated so that you are able to receive the Social Security Disability benefits that you need.

What not to do if your SSD application is denied (one)

According to recent data from the Social Security Administration, there were nearly 3.4 million Social Security Disability claims made in fiscal year 2011, about two-thirds of which were initially denied. In turn, applicants made nearly 900,000 SSD appeals to the hearing level during the year. It is unknown how many of those appeals were successful, but one thing is clear: for many SSD applicants, an appeal is a necessary step in receiving those much-needed disability benefits.

Social Security Disability and autism

Earlier this week we wrote about the potentially changing definition of autism in the American Psychiatric Association's upcoming revisions to its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Under the proposed changes, the number of children who are diagnosed will likely decrease significantly. This may affect the number of children who qualify for Social Security Disability and Supplemental Security Income benefits.

Amended autism definition may make it harder to get SSD benefits

As the American Psychiatric Association (APA) works to revise its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or D.S.M., parents in California and across the U.S. are wondering what effect the APA's decisions will have on their children and families. Specifically, many are worried that proposed changes in the APA's definition of autism could result in fewer diagnoses of the disorder, and of a resulting inability to receive Social Security Disability or Supplemental Security Income benefits, special education, and medical treatment.

Social Security Administration revises Death Master File policies

Although this is primarily a blog about Social Security Disability and issues that affect current or potential SSD benefits in California and throughout the country, occasionally the Social Security Administration will institute a change or new policy of which we think our readers should be aware. The recent changes to the Social Security Administration's policies regarding its Death Master File are such an exception.

American Heart Month spotlights heart-related disabilities

This month marks the annual American Heart Month, as sponsored by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The goal of the month is to call attention to heart disease and related disabilities, and to educate people in California and throughout the country on steps they can take to prevent heart-related illness and ailments.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CASE EVALUATION
Tell Us About Your Case

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Subscribe to This Blog's Feed FindLaw Network