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What if an inability to work is limited to one job; not all jobs?

Many Los Angeles residents have found themselves in a situation where they have developed a disability and they are facing a complete inability to work at the job they have held for years. Such a situation can trigger many emotions, from fear to anger to despair. But, anyone who is familiar with previous posts here knows that a Los Angeles resident in this type of situation may be able to qualify for Social Security Disability benefits.

As one part of the application process to attempt to be approved for SSD benefits, the Social Security Administration will look at a person's ability to work. The starting point is usually the job that the person most recently held, regardless of whether the person held the job for only a couple of months or many years. The most recent job is a good indication of the type of work that the person was qualified to perform and was able to physically perform.

But, what if a person's inability to work is limited to the previous job? What if a person, despite the onset of a disability, is able to perform another job and earn an income that can support their financial situation? Well, in this type of situation, the reality is that the Social Security Administration will likely deny the application for SSD benefits.

When a Los Angeles resident submits an application for SSD benefits, that application needs to make it very clear that the applicant is unable to work in any capacity. The disability may have developed over time, or it may have resulted from a work accident. But satisfying the medical requirements that show that a disability is present isn't enough; applicants must also be able to show that they are unable to work in any capacity as a result.

Source: The Motley Fool, "What Benefits Do You Get From Social Security Disability?," May 22, 2016

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