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You can't always plan for a disabling work-related injury

Planning for the unexpected has become a big part of the American culture. There are even popular television shows, such as "Doomsday Preppers," that highlight the steps that many people take to do their best to be prepared for bad situations. In Los Angeles, many people identify with this need to be prepared, as our history with earthquakes can leave some people nervous about what could occur at any moment. But, as prepared as we try to be, there aren't many people who are prepared to become disabled due to a work-related injury.

Each year millions of Americans find themselves unable to work due to a physical limitation that they must learn to live with. For many of these people, the disability occurs in the course of their work duties, and their inability to work is resulting in lost wages and other financial pressures. The people who find themselves in this type of situation may not have planned or prepared for it, but there could be help nonetheless.

Social Security disability benefits can be sought by workers who meet the requisite qualifications. These workers must have earned the appropriate number of "work credits" -- they worked long enough and recently enough -- and their physical or mental condition must meet the definition of "disability," as used by the Social Security Administration.

Qualifying for SSD benefits for injury can be a good way to ease some of the financial pressure that a person can feel if they are no longer able to participate in the workforce. Los Angeles residents typically don't plan for the possibility of an unexpected disability, but SSD benefits are there for those who qualify.

Source: Las Cruces Sun-News, "Be prepared when disaster strikes," Ray Vigil, Dec. 19, 2015

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