Jump to Navigation

When the SSA verifies California cases

As some of our Los Angeles readers may recall from previous posts here, receiving Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits often is not a permanent financial arrangement. In many cases, the person receiving SSD benefits is subsequently able to find employment that accommodates the person's disability and allows the person to earn an adequate income. These are "success stories," as far as the Social Security Administration (SSA) is concerned, because although SSD benefits are there when needed for millions of American workers, the fact is that active participation in the workforce is, in general, better for the country's economy.

This is one of the reasons that the SSA will periodically review the circumstances of individuals who receive SSD benefits. Besides the possibility that the person may find work, the SSA will also attempt to verify that the person is in fact still disabled -- their condition has not improved to the point where the person would no longer meet the definition of "disabled," as that term is used by the SSA.

Of course, SSD benefits recipients are also obligated to voluntarily report changes in either their health or employment status to the Social Security Administration. Not every change will result in a change to the person's status as a benefits recipient, but the SSA should be informed nonetheless.

When a Los Angeles resident's case is being reviewed, the Social Security Administration will alert the person and seek their cooperation in the review. Just like the initial application process, it is important for people who are under review to provide all of the relevant documents and information that is requested by the SSA.

Source: SSA.gov, "Disability Planner: Your Continuing Eligibility for Benefits," accessed on Nov. 21, 2015

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information
CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CASE EVALUATION
Tell Us About Your Case

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Subscribe to This Blog's Feed FindLaw Network