Jump to Navigation

November 2015 Archives

Defining "disability" when a California child is applying for SSI

By now, many of our Californian readers probably know the definition of "disability" used by the Social Security Administration to determine whether a person qualifies to receive Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits. And, many Los Angeles residents probably know that, for children, SSD benefits are not an option. But, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) might be. Nonetheless, what many people may not know is that the definition of "disability" when it comes to children applying for SSI benefits is slightly different than the definition applied to SSD applicants.

When the SSA verifies California cases

As some of our Los Angeles readers may recall from previous posts here, receiving Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits often is not a permanent financial arrangement. In many cases, the person receiving SSD benefits is subsequently able to find employment that accommodates the person's disability and allows the person to earn an adequate income. These are "success stories," as far as the Social Security Administration (SSA) is concerned, because although SSD benefits are there when needed for millions of American workers, the fact is that active participation in the workforce is, in general, better for the country's economy.

How can the SSA help Californians suffering from blindness?

In general, blindness affects Californians in two way: those who have been blind all their lives, and those who become blind, either by way of an accident, injury, illness or due to the gradual aging process. In both situations, Californians who suffer from blindness can face a wide variety of challenges, most notable of which is the ability to earn a living.

What can Californians expect after SSD benefits approval?

For Los Angeles residents who go through the arduous application process for Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits, getting notification that the application has been approved can bring about a huge sigh of relief. Knowing that you will be able to receive at least some form of financial assistance when you are facing a complete inability to work due to disability can be enormously comforting. But, what exactly should Los Angeles residents expect upon being approved to receive SSD benefits?

Determining California residents' "residual functional capacity"

There are many California residents who receive Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits, but are still able to manage to take care of many of their day-to-day needs. They are not completely incapacitated -- it is just that their disability leaves them with a complete inability to work. That is the very definition of "disability," according to the Social Security Administration (SSA).

Is a California mental impairment harder to prove?

The veil is being lifted on mental health issues in California. For many years, a Californian who suffered from a mental impairment may have felt shunned, stigmatized or flat-out shamed. Some were simply committed to a mental health institution to live out their days. However, now that the American populace is beginning to become educated on just how prevalent mental health conditions can be, the Nation is seeking better ways to address this national issue.

Difference between onset and application date for Californians

A Los Angeles resident who is approved to receive Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits will probably feel a great sense of relief. These benefits help millions of Americans make ends meet when they are unable to work due to a disability. But, there are two important dates that will become part of the benefits that are received: the onset date and the application date.

Explaining the term "disability" in California

Previous posts here have provided details on a wide variety of topics connected to the Social Security Disability program in California. However, our Los Angeles readers should be very clear about the actual meaning of the term "disability."

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CASE EVALUATION
Tell Us About Your Case

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Subscribe to This Blog's Feed FindLaw Network