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What are the important facts about Social Security Disability?

Like many of the so-called "entitlement" programs administered by the federal government, the Social Security Administration works hard to dispel some of the myths that are commonly espoused about the Social Security Disability program. To hear some people tell it, SSD benefits are given out to any and all - all they have to do is ask. That, of course, is nonsense, and the Social Security Administration's website has a page dedicated to trying to set the record straight. So, what are some of the most important facts about Social Security Disability?

First, SSD benefits are earned by workers. Part of the payroll tax that employees pay goes toward funding Social Security Disability. People can only get SSD benefits if they have earned enough work credits. Next, the term "disability" is defined very strictly. If an applicant for SSD benefits is unable to provide the requisite documentation showing that they meet the medical requirements for disability, they will not qualify for SSD benefits.

Another important fact to consider is an ominous one - that an injury or illness can strike anyone at any time. It is not just older Americans who become disabled. For those who unexpectedly find themselves unable to earn an income, SSD benefits can help. But, the next fact then comes into play: monthly benefits, even if a person is awarded the maximum benefits, don't add up to much more than what it takes to keep the recipient just above the poverty level. However, the benefits can still provide a great deal of financial assistance.

There are two final important facts to consider. The first is that the number of people who are qualifying for SSD benefits is increasing. And, lastly, the Social Security Administration strives to prevent and detect fraud, so that only those who truly qualify will receive SSD benefits.

Anyone in the Los Angeles area who has question about Social Security Disability benefits may want to contact an experienced Social Security attorney.

Source: SSA.gov, "Facts," Accessed June 7, 2015

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