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June 2015 Archives

Considering income and resources when applying for SSI benefits

Any of our Los Angeles readers who are familiar with previous posts here know that there is a difference when applying for and receiving Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability benefits. SSD benefits are awarded to those who have the requisite employment history, in addition to having a qualifying medical condition. SSI benefits, on the other hand, can be awarded to a person regardless of their previous employment history.

When fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome cause disability

There is a myth associated with Social Security Disability benefits that in order to qualify, a person has to be suffering from a terminal or otherwise very serious illness, like cancer or heart disease. As anyone who is familiar with previous posts here already knows, that simply isn't true. There is a wide range of medical conditions that a person could suffer from that would limit their ability to work, thereby potentially leading to qualifying for SSD benefits. Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome are two examples.

How much work history do you need to qualify for SSD benefits?

There is quite a bit of information that goes into an application for Social Security Disability benefits. This is because the applicant must provide sufficient medical documentation to show that the disability is due to a qualifying medical condition. In addition, the applicant must show evidence that the disability is severe enough that the condition will last for at least a year.

Are SSI benefits enough to provide for housing?

Supplemental Security Income helps millions of Americans make ends meet financially. This monthly benefit oftentimes makes the difference for families who would otherwise have no means of financial support. However, according to a recent report, SSI benefits may not be enough for some people.

What are the important facts about Social Security Disability?

Like many of the so-called "entitlement" programs administered by the federal government, the Social Security Administration works hard to dispel some of the myths that are commonly espoused about the Social Security Disability program. To hear some people tell it, SSD benefits are given out to any and all - all they have to do is ask. That, of course, is nonsense, and the Social Security Administration's website has a page dedicated to trying to set the record straight. So, what are some of the most important facts about Social Security Disability?

Medical expenses for treating a mental impairment

For a Los Angeles resident suffering from a disability, the ability to pay for the necessary medical treatment is usually a primary concern. After all, we all know that medical costs in this country are incredibly high, even in the aftermath of the federal government's attempt to reign in those costs through the Affordable Care Act, or "Obamacare."

Long-term care and the disabled

The Social Security Administration defines a disability as a physical or mental health condition that will last for at least 12 months and leaves a person with a complete inability to work. But, for many people, being unable to work for an extended period of time is the least of their concerns -- they are going to be disabled for the rest of their lives and they are incapable of doing much more than just work.

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