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Life after becoming disabled

Our regular readers in Los Angeles know from previous posts here that there is a wide range of medical conditions that could get a person qualified to receive Social Security Disability benefits. The disability could be physical or mental - as long as the condition is expected to keep the person out of the workforce for a year or more, getting approved for SSD benefits could be a possibility. But what about life after becoming disabled?

Contrary to what many people may believe, being disabled doesn't have to mean that a person is unhealthy or that they can't participate in society. Sure, a disability can be limiting - so limiting, in fact, that a person is left with a complete inability to work. But society has made huge strides in attempting to ensure that disabled people can go places and do the same things that the rest of us can.

A huge part of the effort to help people with disabilities find their place in society was the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990. The ADA mandated many changes to both public and private entities to ensure that disabled people could have access.

In addition to the changes that have been implemented in the wake of the ADA, many are taking on the task of helping disabled people stay healthy in spite of their disability. For instance, many communities have exercise programs that are specifically tailored for individuals who may not be able to participate in the more common exercises like running or biking. As society changes and more places begin to accommodate people with disabilities, Social Security Disability benefits will be there to help with financial needs.

Source: www.cdc.gov, "People with Disabilities," Accessed April 25, 2015

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