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SSD benefits could help people who are suffering from MS or lupus

Lupus and multiple sclerosis are two autoimmune diseases that the medical community is still trying to understand. The effect of these diseases can be different for each Californian, but the process seems to be the same: the body's immune system actually attacks tissue within the person's body.

Over time, the effects of Multiple Sclerosis and Lupus can be quite debilitating. For instance, some people with these conditions eventually have trouble with their vision, or they even lose the ability to stand or walk. Others may have a loss of hearing, and it can even result in mental impairment. Lupus, specifically, can leave a person experiencing chronic pain. In short, a person who is diagnosed with MS or lupus could eventually become severely disabled.

At our law firm, we have experience helping people who are suffering from MS or lupus apply for SSD benefits. These benefits can go a long way toward helping a person who is suffering from one of these two diseases make ends meet.

Even if a person has been specifically diagnosed with one of these two diseases, full documentation of the medical condition and its effect on the person needs to be submitted to the Social Security Administration in an application for benefits. Many people with either of these two conditions can participate in the workforce up to a certain point, but eventually it can become too hard to do their job. For more information on our firm's ability to help people with MS or lupus, please visit see our listing of various impairments and how we may be able to help.

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