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An overview of the most common disabilities for SSD recipients

People from all walks of life may find themselves in a position where they have to apply for Social Security Disability one day. The list of disabilities that could qualify a person to receive SSD benefits is long, but there are some conditions and diseases that are more common than others.

For instance, according to one report an estimated 32 percent of people who are receiving Social Security Disability benefits qualified because of a mental illness. More and more is understood about mental illness every day, but for millions of Americans a mental illness can leave them debilitated and unable to work. When that is the case, SSD benefits can help.

Next, an estimated 30 percent of SSD recipients are suffering from some kind of musculoskeletal condition. This could include back injuries or arthritis, although there are many other types of conditions that would fall into this category. After that, about 9 percent of recipients have conditions associated with their nervous system, while approximately 8 percent have heart disease or another form of illness or disease associated with their circulatory system.

The rest of SSD recipients throughout the country suffer from a wide variety of disabilities. The one thing that all SSD benefits recipients have in common is that their disability has left them unable to work and earn a living income. SSD benefits make a huge difference in the lives of millions of Americans, including many people in Los Angeles. Anyone who believes they may have a medical condition that could qualify them for SSD benefits would probably find it helpful to get more information about their unique situation.

Source: www.nasi.org, "What is Social Security Disability Insurance?" accessed on March 8, 2015

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