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Are you unable to work because of carpal tunnel syndrome?

There are millions of workers in America whose job includes tasks that demand hard, physical labor. Many of those workers probably daydream about having a "cushy desk job" instead. On the other hand, there are many office workers who sit at a computer all day and probably daydream about being outside in the sun. There is a significant issue that these office workers may have to be concerned about, even though they aren't lifting and walking all day - carpal tunnel syndrome.

For those who don't know, carpal tunnel syndrome is a medical condition that affects a person's wrists and hands, and it usually comes about in individuals who type on a keyboard all day or otherwise use their hands in repetitive tasks like typing. This condition is what is known as a "repetitive stress" injury, meaning that the condition occurs over time due to a person doing the same thing over and over again. In many cases a worker can correct the problem before it occurs by repositioning the way they hold their hands as they type or do their job. However, sometimes this isn't enough.

Carpal tunnel syndrome, also known as CTS, is actually fairly common. In the least severe instances of the condition a person may experience acute pain or maybe tingling in their hands and wrists. In the worst-case scenarios the worker may have complete numbness or swelling. Either way, the condition could keep a worker from doing their job.

At our firm we have helped clients who have suffered from CTS and are unable to work. In some cases the condition can be so severe that a worker qualifies for Social Security Disability benefits for the injury. For more information on how our firm attempts to help Los Angeles workers suffering from CTS, please visit the CTS page of our website.

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