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Disability benefits for people with Alzheimer's Disease

There are many social efforts out there that attempt to raise the awareness level for certain types of illnesses. For instance, the color pink has quickly become associated with efforts to raise support for women suffering from breast cancer. And some high-profile athletes have attempted to call attention to mental disorders as a way to lessen the stigma that some people say is associated with these types of conditions. But, there is perhaps no disease that has become as high-profile as Alzheimer's Disease has in the last few years.

More and more people are beginning to recognize how Alzheimer's Disease, or ALZ, as it is commonly labeled, can impact the lives of an entire family. As the American population ages due to advances in medical science and healthier lifestyles, millions of people will likely have some personal experience with what it is like for someone to suffer from ALZ.

The good news is that the federal government has recognized that ALZ is a type of disability for which an individual should be approved for Social Security Disability benefits. Even the early onset of the disease has been recognized as an issue.

Unlike someone who is suffering from a physical disease, like cancer or heart disease, an individual who is suffering from ALZ will likely need more than just medical treatment. The individual may need special attention to keep their minds active and engaged, in order to attempt to offset the symptoms of ALZ for as long as possible. When someone who is suffering from ALZ is approved for SSD benefits, the financial assistance may go a long way toward improving that person's quality of life.

Source: alz.org, "Social Security Disability," Accessed Nov. 29, 2014

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