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How is the Social Security Administration organized?

Some of our Los Angeles readers may know that the federal government employs many people across the United States. It takes a lot of people to keep the government running, and the Social Security Administration is part of the picture.

As our readers can probably imagine, it takes thousands of people to make sure that millions of Americans are receiving their monthly Social Security checks. This includes checks not only for Social Security Disability and Supplement Security Income, but also for retirement benefits. Believe it or not, the Social Security Administration employs more than 60,000 people at facilities throughout the country.

The SSA is headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland. However, there are about 1,230 field offices that are overseen by 10 regional offices. The SSA also operates six processing centers. Carolyn W. Colvin is the acting Commissioner of the SSA. However, she is not alone in managing the overall structure of the SSA. She currently has eight Deputy Commissioners who are also integral to the agency's ability to meet all of the requirements it takes to maintain this important social safety net. These Deputy Commissioners in turn take care of their respective divisions of the SSA, along with their Assistant Deputy Commissioners.

It may come as a surprise to many of our readers that so many people are involved in the day-to-day business of making sure that Social Security beneficiaries are receiving their monthly checks, and that those checks are in the correct amount. When SSA news hits the headlines it is usually negative, but millions of Americans depend on the hard work of the tens of thousands of employees at the Social Security Administration.

Source: ssa.gov, "Organizational Structure of the Social Security Administration," Accessed Nov. 1, 2014

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