Jump to Navigation

The impact of work-related injuries

Every year thousands of Americans suffer work-related injuries that leave them unable to return to work. This is true despite the fact that daily progress is made across every sector of the economy to improve the safety of working conditions, and despite the fact that whole government agencies, such as the Occupational Safety & Health Administration, are dedicated to ensuring that workplaces throughout the country are safe.

So, just how common are work-related injuries? Too common, according to statistics kept by the Department of Labor. The statistics show that more than 4,400 workers were actually killed in work-related accidents last year alone. That comes out to about 12 worker deaths each day of that year.

If those are the statistics on work-related fatalities, just imagine how many more accidents took place in which the worker survived but was severely injured and unable to work. Most workers who find themselves in this type of situation come to find out that those lost wages begin to have an impact on the financial stability of their family immediately.

The inability to work due to an injury that occurred on the job can leave a worker frustrated and upset. Beyond that, the financial troubles that come with being injured, oftentimes including significant medical expenses, just adds to the frustration level. Fortunately, many injured workers may find out that they are eligible to apply for Social Security Disability benefits. They will need to meet the federal requirements, just like everyone else who applies for SSD benefits, but if the application is successful there will be at least some relief from the financial pressure that a work-related injury can create.

Source: osha.gov, "Commonly Used Statistics," Accessed Oct. 26, 2014

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information
CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CASE EVALUATION
Tell Us About Your Case

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Subscribe to This Blog's Feed FindLaw Network