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The public needs to know more about Social Security Disability

There are a lot of stereotypes associated with Americans who receive Social Security benefits. For instance, most people think that retirees who receive Social Security benefits are "old," even though the early retirement age is 62 and those same people would probably agree that if someone stays active they can delay the effects of aging. When it comes to Social Security Disability, some people have the unfortunate perception that anyone receiving SSD benefits is either lazy or faking. But, as a recent article pointed out, perhaps a little more information would change that perception.

As the recent article noted, the process of applying for and getting approved for SSD benefits can be extremely tough. And, because the requirements are so strict, most people would probably do anything to avoid finding themselves in a category where they qualify for SSD benefits. To get approved for SSD benefits an applicant must have a very serious disability - one that is expected to last for more than one year, or result in the applicant's death. Who would want to be in that type of position? And who could fake that?

The fact is that an applicant's disability must be so severe that they can no longer work. This not only means that the person can't do the job they had before the disability, it also means that they pretty much can't do any other job either.

More information is always the key to greater understanding. People face the inability to work for a wide variety of reasons, from a serious illness to an injury they suffered in a work accident. When more people become informed about the requirements for getting SSD benefits, perhaps there will be less stereotypes and more understanding.

Source: The Acorn, "The many faces of disability," Essie Landry, Aug. 14, 2014

Source: The Acorn, "The many faces of disability," Essie Landry, Aug. 14, 2014

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