Jump to Navigation

Los Angeles residents could benefit from more SSD information

When one of our Los Angeles readers is looking into getting more SSD information that is pertinent to their situation, it is usually because they have a keen interest in getting some financial help. There is no doubt that many of the millions of Americans who receive Social Security Disability benefits arrive in their financial situation through necessity - unable to work through no fault of their own. When it comes to financial assistance, however, people with disabilities may be able to get more help than just SSD benefits.

According to a recent article, individuals who suffer from severe disabilities may be able to receive substantial help with their student loan debts. While many people already know that they may be able to apply for and receive a forbearance on repayment of student loans due to a disability, those who find themselves in much more dire situations may be eligible a discharge of the debts altogether.

As wonderful as that type of assistance sounds, however, the bar to meet to be considered for this type of discharge is high. The article notes that it is usually only those individuals who suffer from a disability so severe that they don't expect to be able to work for over five years - or who expect that their disability will result in death - who could be eligible for a discharge of student loan debt.

The fact is that getting more information about Social Security in general could lead a person to find an aspect of the program that could help them specifically. Staying on top of the news coming from the Social Security Administration could be the starting point for finding a way to get some serious financial relief.

Source: SFGate, "Disabled may get some student-loan relief," Kathleen Pender, June 3, 2014

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information
CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CASE EVALUATION
Tell Us About Your Case

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Subscribe to This Blog's Feed FindLaw Network