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Are benefits recipients always hampered by an inability to work?

The inability to work and earn an income is usually the primary motivation for anyone who is applying for Social Security Disability benefits. For people who badly want to work but just can't seem to overcome the limitations of their disability, the final step of applying for SSD benefits can come with a frustrating sense of giving up.

Many people, however, will learn to successfully cope with their disability, be it physical or mental, and at some point in the future they may believe that they are ready to return to the workforce, even with their disability. For our Los Angeles readers who find themselves in this position, a recent announcement from the Department of Labor may offer a bit of hope.

According to a recent report, the Department of Labor has announced a plan to offer $15 million in grants for states to develop initiatives aimed at getting people with disabilities back into the workforce in greater numbers. This $15 million total is expected to be broken up into eight separate grants, and the deadline for states to submit ideas is set for July 8.

A physical injury or mental issue that results in disability does not have to result in a lifetime spent receiving Social Security Disability benefits. As workplaces throughout America become more diverse and more capable of accommodating employees with disabilities, the number of disabled employees in the workforce should rise naturally. This new initiative from the Department of Labor, however, may be a good first step to speed up that process. But, as will remain the case for the millions of people who may never get an opportunity to return to the workforce, there is no shame in applying for SSD benefits to get much needed financial assistance.

Source: disability scoop, "Feds Pledge Millions To Tackle Disability Employment," Shaun Heasley, May 28, 2014

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