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Study: Soft drink consumption causes higher risk of diabetes

Diabetes is a disabling condition that affects millions of people in California and the rest of the United States. In some cases, diabetes can become so severe that it prevents a person from working full time. When this happens, diabetes sufferers may be able to collect Social Security Disability benefits to help supplement their income.

At this point, it isn't known exactly what causes diabetes. However, extensive research has indicated that lifestyle choices like diet and exercise do play a role. In fact, a recent study conducted in Europe found that even one 12-ounce sugary soft drink per day can increase a person's chances of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 22 percent.

The study was conducted by analyzing data collected from more than 28,000 people in European countries including Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Although the data did not come from the United States, it is likely that the results apply here as well.

In fact, previous research among North Americans has demonstrated that people who consume sugary soft drinks have a 25 percent increased risk of diabetes, said the researchers from the most recent study, which was published in the April 24 issue of the health journal Diabetologia.

Interestingly, the researchers found that the 12-ounce soda habit still caused an 18 percent increase in risk of diabetes even when total calorie intake and body-mass index (BMI) were also taken into account. This suggests that the sugary drinks weren't just doing damage to people who were also overweight, one of the researchers explained.

The study also showed that the daily consumption of pure or diluted fruit juice could not be significantly associated with diabetes risk.

Source: Health.com, "12 Ounces of Sugary Soda a Day Raises Diabetes Risk: Study," April 25, 2013

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